Categories
Classic English literature

Define the american dream, and how that dream may be the same or different from what we now consider the american dream.

use references from the materials most quotes should come from kamp article. Explain and provide detailed examples of how each of the authors/works
define the American Dream, and how that dream may be the same or different from what we now consider the American Dream. Again, identify and briefly
explain which literary movement the author is part of. The major goal is to illustrate how the idea of The American Dream has transformed over time
through a discussion of Kamp and your authors.
use the links as little as possible if wanted also cite each article
also use references from these links
http://ezproxy.selu.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=e000xna&AN=522908&site=eds-live&ebv=EB&ppid=pp_Cover
http://ezproxy.selu.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=e000xna&AN=2317945&site=eds-live&ebv=EB&ppid=pp_Cover
3bcird link is in pdf

Categories
Classic English literature

Explain and provide detailed examples of how each of the authors/works

use references from the materials most quotes should come from kamp article. Explain and provide detailed examples of how each of the authors/works
define the American Dream, and how that dream may be the same or different from what we now consider the American Dream. Again, identify and briefly
explain which literary movement the author is part of. The major goal is to illustrate how the idea of The American Dream has transformed over time
through a discussion of Kamp and your authors.
use the links as little as possible if wanted also cite each article
also use references from these links
http://ezproxy.selu.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=e000xna&AN=522908&site=eds-live&ebv=EB&ppid=pp_Cover
http://ezproxy.selu.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=e000xna&AN=2317945&site=eds-live&ebv=EB&ppid=pp_Cover
3bcird link is in pdf

Categories
Classic English literature

The move that i went with was the black phone and i included my rough drabcift in the materials with the instructions.

The move that I went with was the black phone and I included my rough drabcift in the materials with the instructions.

Categories
Classic English literature

What questions remain uppermost in your mind?

After viewing the video(s), answer the following questions in well-written, concise sentences. Minimum requirements: 200 words.
What are the three or four most meaningful and useful things you learned during the video?
What questions remain uppermost in your mind?
Was there anything that was difficult to understand?
Hbciow can you apply what you learned?

Categories
Classic English literature

What type of “soul” does it seem to have?

Below is our first discussion on Frankenstein. This book really stirred me when I read it in highschool, undergraduate, and then graduate school– I loved how rich it was, and I was also so curious as to how the modern fable (the Halloween version of the monster) was so wildly different than that of the original text. I guess that’s the dulling effect of passing down stories; they alter and change culturally in such strange ways.
These discussion questions are exciting, and due before the weekend is over on Sunday night! Please reply to only one of them in about 500 words, and respond to 2 of your peers in about 100 by Sunday if you can!
1: Evolution
Next to our modern period of time, 1800-1860 might have been some of the most unstable periods of time for every branch of science. Evolution as a theory doesn’t come around until the 1860s, but it’s being heavily discussed in the meantime by scientists and (perhaps to your surprise) literary authors. The writing community is heavily involved in the development of science, helping imagine out some of the more abstract ideas that are beginning to form.
We have several major advancements in the novel that Shelly is directly playing with; galvanism, (the idea that life is in electricity; you can shock something into being) and chemistry are really beginning to take a foothold. Biology, physics, and the chemical sciences are beginning to separate into their own disciplines. But most importantly, these separate sciences are being systematized by evolution; not the anti-religious version of it, but the science behind how we genetically look different than our parents, and grandparents, and so on. “Selection” becomes much more important.
Look at Science (capital “S”) within the context of the text; Shelly is playing with these ideas, and is careful to not reveal which is a success and which is a warning. Discuss the ways in which Shelly is both disrupting and helping influence those narratives surrounding the unstable definition that the natural is beginning to take.
2: Texts, Writing, and Language;
Frankenstein is overflowing with language and letters: notes, journals, inscriptions, books, all of these letters fill the novel. Some are nestled inside one another, and others simply allude to other books and philosophies that are quoted. Take a look at how this influences the novel; Walton’s letters bookend the entire story; which then bookends Victor’s story, which then bookends the monster’s story, which then bookends the love story of Felix and Safie; all like a Russian Doll, a story within a story within a story within a story, until the layering is so complex it’s difficult to track. But all of these writings are massively influential to the characters and to their core values and beliefs. Entire belief systems are derived out of texts, and language plays an enormous role in the monster’s development. All of these things help him understand his manner of creation, and what it means to reproduce and to evolve. Analyze literature and language as a theme in the book so far. Where is it taking you?
Women:
Women are alarmingly absent in the novel, but they are in some ways the entire focus of the novel; Gender roles are distinctly and viciously dissected throughout the book, as masculinity tries to take the forefront of the text and pushes everything else to the side. Victor’s entire escapade is essentially imagining the birth of another creature but without the female present in the biologically destined role; he is usurping the authority of the mother and trying to create a child by himself, in some manner of speaking. We therefore have a (biologically) sexual portion of the text that imagines women as absent and unneeded, followed by everything that goes wrong in that absence. Most of the women are domestic in this text, often taking care of children or family members and waiting for men to return home; why would Shelley write this in these terms? With the evolution of sciences, how are women’s bodies being incredibly policed under new realms of surveillance? Does Frankenstein as a book hold stake in that?
The Psychology of Isolation and Loneliness:
Frankenstein suggests that social alienation is both the primary cause of evil and the punishment for it. The Monster explicitly says that his alienation from mankind has caused him to become a murderer: “My protectors had departed, and had broken the only link that held me to the world. For the first time the feelings of revenge and hatred filled my bosom.” His murders, however, only increase his alienation.
Victor is not much different than this, as his social alienation causes him to make less than desirable decisions. His ambition is not in check, and he cannot tell anyone about what he’s done- whether proud or mortified by it. Both compare themselves to Satan being cast out of Heaven at separate points in the text, and develop a hatred of one another and themselves. Trace the ways in which this makes each character monsterous; see if you can find other quotes that suggest how bitterness arrives from this loneliness.
Nature and Power;
Similar to our discussion on Wuthering Heights, Frankenstein treats the natural as a powerful force in and of itself—although the “hauntings” that are occurring are a direct result of science this time. Consider Nature as it’s own character in the novel; how is Shelley shaping it to be a destructive force? Who does it strengthen in the book, and who does it weaken? What words are used to describe it, and why? What type of “soul” does it seem to have? Who is in control of the naturabcil; is it man or is that a massively failed illusion?

Categories
Classic English literature

Gender roles surrounding women show how much of a grip they have on the story (as a whole) towards the end, with the attempt at creating a female monster.

Hello class!!
Respond to one of the prompts below; as always, about 500 words will get you in the space you need for a full response. As we wrap up Frankenstein, keep in mind that The Awakening is next!
1. Maternity
Similar but different from the earlier question on women, consider the following predicament; although largely absent from the text, the act of “creation” proves to be an overwhelmingly female domain in Frankenstein. Gender roles surrounding women show how much of a grip they have on the story (as a whole) towards the end, with the attempt at creating a female monster. Consider how the story would have been different had Elizabeth Lavenza, Victor’s love, created the monster instead. Might she have been a better role model for the created being, maybe even maternal in instinct, as she is towards Victor’s siblings? What does this say about femininity and maternity when they are forced out of the equation in nurture and nourishment?
2. Knowledge is Power, Ambition is Danger:
Ambition often goes hand-in-hand with villany, and Frankenstein shows that human beings are deeply ambitious. Victor and Walton dream of transforming society and bring glory to themselves through their scientific achievements. However, their actions are deeply flawed and bring misfortune to every other character present– and most importantly, they seem to block Victor from some common sense. Arguably, Victor decided not to create a female mate for his Creature because he is worried they could have children. However, he could have made her infertile while still granting him companionship; but for someone so intelligent, he can’t see that solution.
Upon trying to improve his life through money, fame, and power in his creation, Victor has done exactly the opposite of what he set out to do in the first place; look at the ambition of science as a whole, and consider again the gendered aspect we are reading into here: this “Mother Nature, Father Science” setup that allows the male characters to achieve such complex and dangerous results in the realm of science. About midway through the novel, most members of the audience are rooting against Victor instead of for him, given that he’s trying to achieve his own version of heaven-on-earth through an extremist lens.
3. Revenge:
This prompt is rather simple. Examine the idea that Revenge is the true motivation of the story- not love, not creation, power, or even sex and reproduction—but vengeance. Who is vengeful? There’s an old trope that writes “Villains Act, Heroes React”- but isn’t the monster is reacting to his circumstances that Victor has first put him into? Does he have other choices in the matter as to how things unfold? Is he being vengeful or is he simply trying to biologically stay alive in his species? Look at Victor, the Monster, and any other character you can find traces of in terms of Revenge. Examine the theme as a vehicle that powers throughout the storyline, and show how it functions in the text with a few examples, and see if you agree that it’s the most important motivator we’ve come across thus far.
4. Nested Storyline:
Consider the Russian-doll effect of the novel; the family on whom the monster is spying is telling a story, who at one point the monster is telling to Victor, who is in turn telling this entire story to the captain of a ship bound for the North pole, who is actually relating all of this in a letter to his friend. Take one story apart, and there’s another inside it, and inside that, and so on and so on. How does each different story demand different parts of the readers attention? There are many levels to this text; what makes the “outermost” ones powerful, and the “innermost” ones the core of the story? Why do we leap from certain sequences at certain times? There are several moments where Victor interrupts our reading to remind us that he is recounting thinbcigs that have already happened; one part…

Categories
Classic English literature

At the top of the first page, students must include a title for the essay (not the title of the story), the date of submissiobcin, and the word count.

1000-WORD FICTION ANALYSIS (20pts): Students will submit a typed, titled, double-spaced essay of at least 1000 words analyzing an element of one of the four stories discussed in class (“Story of an Hour”, “Araby”, “The Yellow Wallpaper”, “The Birthmark”). For instance, an effective topic might be to evaluate the dangers of impulsive thoughts and actions in “Story of an Hour” or “Araby” or to analyze the role of uncontrollable outside forces in “The Yellow Wallpaper” or “The Birthmark”. Beyond having just opinions of these stories, students are required to make direct references to relevant passages from the story. NOTE: This essay must be submitted as a DOCX or PDF file so you should “Browse Local Files” to attach your assignment. Fiction essays may exceed 1000 words, but a penalty will be incurred for essays below 1000 words. At the top of the first page, students must include a title for the essay (not the title of the story), the date of submissiobcin, and the word count.

Categories
Classic English literature

Our previous two novels have been incredibly heavy in romanticism, a perspective that emphasizes emotion, inner life, and a wide variety of experience.

Hello class!
I want to start by saying that I love The Awakening. Next to Sula, which we will read in a few weeks, Kate Chopin’s novel is among the best we will read this semester, and hopefully one of the more impactful books you’ll encounter in an English class. The book is set in New Orleans and other parts of Louisiana, and maps a woman named Edna Pontellier deconstruct her ideas of femininity, motherhood, and agency within women at the turn of the century. It’s a really psychologically complex novel, and a pretty delicious read at times.
At it’s base, it’s about an affair between our main character Edna, a man named Robert, and a complex third friend/relationship with her friend Adele- all while Edna tries to navigate her desire for social freedom, which she can’t reconcile with being a mother and bound to a family.
I’m really excited to see what you have to say about this novel; read about to page 140-150 if you can! We’re trying to wrap this one up in two weeks, and it tips over just 300 pages.
Respond to one of the following prompts in 400-500 words by Sunday, and then to two of your peers in 150 word replies;
1. Emptiness, and the Need for Individuality:
The biggest question that The Awakening asks is a very simply “who am I?” And just as importantly, “who do other people think I am?” There’s an expectancy in both of these questions, and a desire for freedom from both of them as well.
These two questions, although never asked by the author or voiced by the main character, drive all of Edna’s behavior in Louisiana. A deep emptiness haunts her, as she is disengaged from what seems to be her true self, muddled down by obligations to her husband and children that are ill-fitting to her, and her loss of connection in meaningful ways in her personal life. What is her solution to these, or her escape rope? The novel is never clear, so there are no correct answers; Edna feels loose, untethered, and that life itself is a peculiar and humiliating experience. But what, if anything, would solve this emptiness? Why is she experiencing it in the first place?
2. Feminism:
This is perhaps our most lucrative area of study in this novel; or maybe the loudest theme is another way to say it. Femininity is controlled and defined with severity in 1900s New Orleans; it is as strict as it was years ago before the Women’s Rights movements, given that misogyny did not disappear; but simply adapted to the prevailing norms of society. Women at this time still cannot vote or hold property, and in most cases, cannot file for divorce or escape a marriage. The convention continues to dictate that women should not engage in anything “dirty” physically, (literally—they shouldn’t be active or walk on unpaved or dirty landscape) should never pick up the vices that men are allowed with smoking and drinking, and above all, should only tolerate sex—never desire it for themselves, even in marriage.
Examine the ways that Edna is caught in this- when does she reveal how she feels about her situation? In what ways does she communicate that she’s not happy with it? In just the first few chapters we see Edna begin to separate her femininity into two separate voices; one that conforms to these named conventions in order to get by and have some agency, and another that is not angry; but loud, wild, thoughtful, and uncontrolled.
3. Water:
The biggest and most constant motif in our story arrives in just the first few chapters, and is inextricably tied to language surrounding power, escape, and uncontrolled emotion. Water is even said to have memory at one point in the text; and when in the water, Edna is only aware of her own position and her individuality. Later in the text we will examine how the theme of water and the ocean directly connects to her “awakening,” but in the meantime, trace the instances where it relates to Edna and her surroundings. Is water talked about in terms of baptism and clensing? Or sometimes characterized as blank and void places? Is there gendered language around the ocean? Is it a freeing or horrible thing?
4. The Phases of Deep Emotional Change:
Edna slightly shifts in every chapter; it isn’t an instant or sharp pivot in her emotional wellbeing that occurs in one night. Her ordinary vision of her marriage is sharpened by her deep shifting understanding of herself and of the women around her. Eventually, we will see her sense of reality almost abandon her completely in the second half of the novel; but for now, focus on the first half of the text. In what ways is Edna different chapter by chapter? What contradictions do we see in her that were consistent in one place, but are jarring and disjointed in others? Trace as she both becomes familiar and alien to herself, and both withdraws and opens up, as much of the novel has to do with the duality of coming undone. Feel free to bring psychoanalysis into this prompt as a means of tracking the change, but it can just as effectively be done without it.
5. Realism
Our previous two novels have been incredibly heavy in romanticism, a perspective that emphasizes emotion, inner life, and a wide variety of experience. By the time The Awakening is happening, (both being written and occurring in the narrative,) Realism has taken a front-and-center place in the literary world; balancing facts, surfaces, and the practicality of life as the most important themes in the American consciousness. We see this tension of both elements in the text, with Realism having a clear upper hand; as if it’s the force sometimes acting on the women to create a repressed, flat and oblique perception of their function in society. Edna’s marriage is, through a realist lens, the thing that drags her into a dormancy. Examine the other areas of Realism and the function that they have on the text, and the ways in which some characters harness this theme; while others try to escape it throubcigh much more ambiguous means.

Categories
Classic English literature

Your essay must include a work cited page.

Your essay must include the image (once) cited.
Place the Figure 1 directly under the image.
Your essay must include a Work Cited page.
Do not highligbciht your text
600 Words

Categories
Classic English literature

I need to ensure this will be authentic as it is checked for plagiarism and a big concebcirn for me as i try this.

In “Allegory of the Cave” Socrates describes education in terms of “freedom”. Do you find this vision convincing? How might one be freed (or shackled) through education? ** Must incorporate one piece of material from a reading such as – David Bohn “On Communication” This is the 1st time using this service, thank you so much!! I need to ensure this will be authentic as it is checked for plagiarism and a big concebcirn for me as I try this. THANK YOU!!!